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How to Grill Steak on a Wolf OG36 Grill

Written by Appliance Dude | September 4th, 2014

Who says summer is over?

Decided to grill a strip steak on my Wolf OG36 grill and document the results for your viewing pleasure.

First step: went to visit the moody butcher “Mini” in Bronxville who gets an “F” for personality but an “A” in quality meats.
What looked good today…skirt steaks in a teriyaki marinade, lamb kebobs, rack of lamb, chicken/parsely/cheese burgers, pork chops..a vegetarian’s nightmare!

Instead of defaulting to the standard skirt steak (which in his marinade turns my Wolf OG36 grill into a flamethrower) I purchased an absolutely succulent looking strip steak which was marinated in olive oil and pepper.

Strip Steak from Mini's in Bronxville, lightly coated with coffee steak rub, salt and pepper.

Strip Steak from Mini’s in Bronxville, lightly coated with coffee steak rub, salt and pepper.

Another view of the strip steak showing it's beautiful fat profile.

Another view of the strip steak showing it’s beautiful fat profile.

Took it home, shook a little coffee rub onto both sides and then took it over to the Wolf OG36 which has already been preheating for 10 mins. Actually, to that point let me reveal my standard grill prep which I use every time and was taught to me by the zen grill masters Steve Reichlen and Jamie Purviance:

NB – grates have already been scraped clean from prior usage

1- grill turned on to HIGH – let it ride for 10-15 mins until you hit 600 degrees or so

2 – when grill is at temp paint grates with canola oil (do NOT use olive oil which has a lower burn threshold)

3 – place meat on grill

4 – Sear meat on DIRECT HIGH HEAT for 2 mins, moving clockwise halfway through to create cross hatch marks. Flip and repeat. Note these were at least 1.5″ steaks so I used a slightly longer cooking time.

5 – Move steak to INDIRECT HEAT side (I had this side set to LO) and let the steak cook for another 3-4 mins on each side before removing for MEDIUM RARE.

My goal was to create a substantial crust b/c there is nothing like the contrast of a caramelized outer crust and a subcutaneous tender, juicy middle.
So I used the dry coffee rub on both sides and went about searing.
Some experts will tell you to mist the steaks with vegetable oil spray which helps the rub cling better. Whatever.

When I took the steak off the grill and I let it sit for about 7 mins which allows the muscle fibers to relax (heat makes them contract) and this will actually draw juice that may been expelled back in.

End result – a damn good steak, and I’m happy to report that the
Wolf OG36 didn’t turn into a flamethrower due to flare-ups which has afflicted this grill since I’ve owned it. CHeck out the vid, there’s only a slight spark of fire (which usually turns into an inferno) which quickly subsides.

Cross hatch marks on the strip steak after a second turn

Cross hatch marks on the strip steak after a second turn

May have been the lighting but the steak was a bit pinker than this picture shows. I love the juxtaposition of the caramelized exterior (what a taste) and the juice interior.

May have been the lighting but the steak was a bit pinker than this picture shows. I love the juxtaposition of the caramelized exterior (what a taste) and the juicy interior.

Posted in: Outdoor Grills, Wolf,

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