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Posts Tagged ‘alfresco 36 grill’

Alfresco Grill Review – To Sear or Not To Sear

Written by Appliance Dude | August 18th, 2017

Do you need an inline sear zone burner in your premium gas grill? The industry upsells them as a sexy feature and I drank the KoolAid for a bit myself, but I’m changing my mind.
Especially if you own a grill that has a dedicated sear burner that cannot be removed. I’d rather have more normal grilling real estate. Watch the vid, hope it helps

Alfresco 42 Grill Review

Written by Appliance Dude | June 4th, 2017

Why do I love Alfresco gas grills?
They are built like tanks.
They have 13 succinct reasons that make them the most versatile grill
and…they knock the s#* out of untamed flareups!

Over the years I have lost too many good pieces of meat to the insidious grip of untamed flareups. While I squarely blame myself for those issues, it didn’t help matters that the grills I was using using capitulated in the face of these meal-ruiners.
That was until I started grilling on an Alfresco ALXE 42 Grill

Because of Alfresco’s brilliantly designed ceramic briquette cooking system, my flareups have been transformed into “flame kisses” that aid in flavorizing my food, instead of turning it into a shade closer to obsidian and leaving it with the taste of a fireplace.

Which means…

Alfresco Grills Have the Best Flare Up Taming System!

Proof is in the pudding…

My wife gave me a few skirt steaks that had been sitting in an Asian marinade bath for a few hours. When they were brought to the white hot Alfresco 42 grill, they were undoubtedly fodder for a serious flare up outbreak.

As you can see from the images below, flames did start to erupt, BUT WERE SUPPRESSED IMMEDIATELY. Because of the close concentration of the briquettes (if you look at Alfresco’s ceramic grid vs the competition there are very few gaps that would allow flames to shoot through) the flames may get through, but they are smacked down after allowing for a brief flame kiss which is a flavor enhancer. More on that next…

Flare Ups are a Good Thing. No, Make that a GREAT Thing.


Flare ups are caused by drippings.
And drippings are what flavors our food.
The folks at GrillGrates feel that the drippings and their byproduct (flareups) are the most instrumental factor in giving your good it’s kick a$# taste. Yes, more important than the wood pellets, chunks, charcoal or (with a gas grill) the chips in a smoker box. We WANT flare ups, but we don’t want sustained flare ups. Instead we need to recontextualize them as “flame kisses” or “flavor bombs”.

BTW, no matter what cooking system you are using, if you don’t clean your grill gates and briquettes, you will be slowly creating a flare up factory.
I clean my Alfresco 42 Grill regularly and make sure to burn away any buildup on the briquettes.

If you have any Alfresco Grill questions please give us a holler and remember we ship Alfresco nationwide…for free! Call us at 1-800-966-2878 to order today!

Alfresco 42 Grill Review

Alfresco 42 Grill - Flareup Gone!

The Alfresco 42 Grill’s ceramic briquettes knock down the flareup.

Alfresco Grill Review: Best Chicken Ever, Indirect Roasting and the Dead – Curtos.com

Written by Appliance Dude | December 29th, 2016

Took another accessory home for my Alfresco ALXE42SZ grill and I ended up making the best chicken I’ve ever produced on the Alfresco.
The indirect roasting pod is entirely legit, check it out and let me know about your results.
It’s accessories like this that separate Alfresco from the other premium gas grills.
Buy one for your Alfresco, load her up with a bird or roast of sorts, make sure the beer is cold and plays some Dead circa 1972!

Free Nationwide Shipping on Alfresco Grills

Alfresco Grill Review: Rocking the Steamer Fryer Insert! – AG-SF

Written by Appliance Dude | December 28th, 2016

Alfresco Grill Review – Steamer Fryer Insert AG-SF

Yes, it did sit in the box for nearly 1 year, but I am happy to announce that I broke open the Alfresco Steamer Fryer insert AG-SF and was astounded by the results!
We did shrimp tempura for the inaugural cook. Not only did the shrimp taste great, but it changes the narrative on what we are willing to cook – reason being is that frying was a rare occurrence because we didn’t want to deal with the smell and cleanup in the kitchen. Now with the Alfresco AG-SF steamer fryer insert, the frying can all be done outside so the kitchen stays sparkly clean! We have tons of ideas on what to do next…fried oreos, fried ice cream, rice balls, eggplant parmigiana, chicken fingers…the only question will be how to do this without causing our collective cholesterol to go through the roof!

Remember, free Nationwide shipping on Alfresco Grills

Curtos.com – Turning an Alfresco ALXE Grill into an Offset Smoker

Written by Appliance Dude | August 4th, 2016

In my never ending quest to bend, warp, re-shape and squeeze every bit of functionality out of my various bbq grills, I’m here to report on my latest project – turning my Alfresco 42″ ALXE grill into an offset smoker.
What?
Yes you ready that correctly.
It’s not enough that I have a Kamado Joe and Memphis wood-fired pellet grill for smoking. And it’s not enough that Alfresco grills already offer a smoking chamber in the grill. Nope. I needed to push things further. Influenced and inspired by the great Steve Raichlen and his show/book “Projcet Smoke”, smoking has become my passion over the last year. So let me explain why I decided to do this and what the initial results were.

I’ve been using the Alfresco SFI-POD (solid fuel insert) since last winter. This is the insert which allows you to cook with lump charcoal and/or wood.
While using it the other week, I noticed that the wood wasn’t burning with flame atop the charcoal, but was instead releasing a lazy, fragrant plume of smoke around the grill.
Pop. Lightbulb went off.

If I had the SFI-POD lit on the side, what if I turned off the other 2 gas burners, and elevated the meat (in this case a spatchcock chicken) on the multi-position cooking rack. Powered by the smoke from the wood and lump coal, could I then emulate the performance of a stick-burner smoker on my Alfresco?

After one night of testing, the answer is no.

The first and biggest problem is that the chicken did not cook evenly as it does on a kamado or pellet grill. The side closest to the SFI-POD (which was on the right) was cooking far quicker than the left side of the bird. I was hoping to see a type of convection process happen withing the cooking chamber which would allow a more even cook, but alas it was not to be. I eventually shifted the bird around with cooking tongs in order to evenly cook each side, and I also turned on the middle burner on the grill on LOW, so as to create some heat from the bottom. This eventually caused some of the fat and seasoning from the bird to drip down on the hot ceramic briquettes, creating lovely little smoke-kisses of flavor.

I’m going to try this again with some modification and will report findings here. Oh, and one other thing – the cooking rack on the Alfresco opens up more possibilities from the griller/smoker b/c of its flexibility. Note how I didn’t call it a warming rack – this device does far more than warm hot dog buns folks. More to come!
Curtos.com - Spatchcock chicken

Spatchcock chicken on the Alfresco Grill.

Spatchcock chicken on the Alfresco Grill.

Curtos.com: Alfresco Grill with Solid Fuel Insert

Curtos.com: Grilling Chicken on Alfresco ALXE42SZ Grill

Curtos.com: Alfresco Grill and SFI-POD

Curtos.com: Alfresco Grill Portabello Mushrooms

Curtos.com: Alfresco Grill / Portabello Mushrooms

Curtos.com: Spatchcock Chicken on Alfresco Grill Solid Fuel Insert